8 Ball Coach Accreditation | Outline of the Coaching Accreditation Pathway 1
8 Ball Coach Accreditation | Outline of the Coaching Accreditation Pathway 1

The National Coaching Committee which consists of eight State & Territory Coaching Directors and the National Director is to administer the National Coaching Framework to deliver a blended approach both online and face-to-face fo their 8 Ball Coach Accreditation.

Outline of the Coaching Accreditation Pathway.

The Eight Ball coaching courses provide participants with quality training, skill set development, and mentoring resources that will assist them to effectively fulfill the role of a Club, State, or National Eight Ball Coach. Achieve is to Believe!.

Eight Ball Coach Accreditation.

The course is initially being offered free of charge, only to those people with a valid Australian postal address. The course is subsidized by the Australian Sports Commission to encourage beginner coaches to undertake training. Learners are encouraged only to enroll if they are genuinely interested in completing the course. Learners will have six months from the date of enrolment to complete the course.

How should a coach behave?

  • Personal qualities, presentation, and passion
    Ethical responsibilities:
    your organization’s code of behavior for coaches and the relevant components of the member protection policy
    the requirements of your organization’s specific policies (eg/ junior sport, inclusion)
    being inclusive and balanced in your approach treating participants with integrity, respect, and empathy
    drugs in sport issues including:
    ASC Anti-Doping policy
    the coach as a role model regarding social drug use
    ethical and health issues regarding the use of drugs in sport
    Personal values vs. community values

Become a coach.

What is the AEBF eLearning portal? Just click here to go right to our eLearning website: https://aebf.asn.au. It will also help other coaches like you who aren’t sure which training methods they can trust with their 8 ball coaching needs. Thanks again for visiting our coaching website and please check out our shop for your coaching needs, https://8ballcoach.com.au/shop/.

 

8 Ball Coach Accreditation.8 Ball Coach Accreditation | Outline of the Coaching Accreditation Pathway 2

8 Ball Coach Accreditation | Outline of the Coaching Accreditation Pathway 2

There are 6 basic steps to attaining your Accredited Eight Ball Coach.

  • 1: AEBF – AEBF Member over 18 years of age

be a registered member of an affiliated State or Territory

  • 2: AEBF – Coach’s Code of Conduct

agree to and sign the Code of Conduct

  • 3: ASC   – Level I Beginning Coaching Principles (8 hours)

complete the ASC Beginning Coaching Principles online or onsite

  • 4: AEBF – Level I Coach Activity Sheet (20 hours)

maintain a diary of all pupils coached

  • 5: AEBF – Level I Eight Ball Training Program Course  (8 hours)

complete the AEBF Training Program online or onsite

  • 6: AEBF – Eight Ball Coach Accreditation Fee $220

pay the applicable fee

What does a coach do?

Learning outcome at the end of this module: ‘I know what I need to do to meet the needs of those I coach’.

The primary aim of the module is to provide a snapshot of a good coach including roles and responsibilities and the coaching pathway.

Roles of the coach for competition and participation and skills required
Range of coaching styles for different situations and individuals (direct to indirect)
Limitations to the role that the coach is able to play in injury management if they are not trained in first aid or providing nutrition advice
Understanding the coaches role in relation to others: AASC regional coordinators, school staff, club administrators, and other coaches
Opportunities for coaches to have a positive impact on participants

Become an Accredited Eight Ball Coach.

What is the AEBF eLearning portal? Just click here to go right to our eLearning website: https://aebf.asn.au. It will also help other coaches like you who aren’t sure which training methods they can trust with their 8 ball coaching needs. Thanks again for visiting our coaching website and please check out our shop for your coaching needs, https://8ballcoach.com.au/shop/

“On Cue: The Complete Guide to Pool by Mark Shepherd is not only an excellent but almost a definitive guide to the sport a first-rate exploration of the game of pool, superbly compiled and explained., Complete Book of Pool”

Review in Snooker Scene Magazine

“It takes an enormous amount of hard work, dedication and attention to detail to produce such an in depth analysis of the game. Mark has done a fantastic job and produced the definitive guide to the sport.”

Steve Daking, Professional Pool Player

“I got this book a few weeks ago and haven’t been able to put it down!! It has everything that a pool player could be interested in from beginner level to advanced. I have been playing for many years and yet found a lot of exercises I have enjoyed trying out and perfecting! This book has the history of the game, coaching to help you improve, trick-shots and much more. It is very well laid out and easy to read. Really enjoying it and would very much recommend it to any pool enthusiasts out there!!”

Reader review on www.amazon.co.uk

On Cue provides a unique insight into one of the world’s most popular games, exploring everything from the forgotten legacy of smoke filled back rooms to the science behind the balls and the technical and tactical qualities needed to succeed.

Providing guidance for beginners and experts alike, hundreds of photographs, illustrations and examples are used to bring to life a detailed analysis of every aspect of the game.

Also included is the full story of pool’s evolution from its little known medieval roots to modern day superstardom, including profiles of the game’s leading personalities and complete listings of all major tournament results.

Complete Book of Pool

 

Become a coach.

What is the AEBF eLearning portal? Just click here to go right to our eLearning website: https://aebf.asn.au. It will also help other coaches like you who aren’t sure which training methods they can trust with their 8 ball coaching needs. Thanks again for visiting our coaching website and please check out our shop for your coaching needs, https://8ballcoach.com.au/shop/

 

 

Neil Turley Typhoon Cues

Neil Turley – Typhoon 8 Ball Coaching is a one on one coaching can be arranged by appointment in either our shop after hours or on your table at home. Groups or teams can also be catered for as required. We also stock and have access to a number of coaching aids from instructional DVDs to training balls, cues etc.

Working with your strengths to overcome your weaknesses. I am a firm believer that the better you can do something, the more enjoyable it becomes. Teaching everything from the basics through to advanced shots is all part of any cue sport discipline, but I work with you in your comfort zone using your best natural abilities to find your best mindset. I’m far from the greatest player around myself, but I understand the game and having a background in teaching various other life skills I can help find the best in you.

Eight Ball Coach Accreditation

The course is initially being offered free of charge, only to those people with a valid Australian postal address. The course is subsidized by the Australian Sports Commission to encourage beginner coaches to undertake training. Learners are encouraged only to enroll if they are genuinely interested in completing the course. Learners will have six months from the date of enrolment to complete the course.

www.typhooncues.com

https://www.facebook.com/typhooncues

Neil Turley – Typhoon Cues
Neil Turley – Typhoon Cues

Scott Matthews – The Routine Instructor

The Routine Instructor certified snooker and 8ball coaching.

Online coaching to anywhere in the world.
Also face to face coaching, either one on one or group coaching in Australia.
Cuesports coaching.

I have helped many top players before, even the likes of Australia’s best-produced players Neil Robertson, Quinten Hann, Aaron Mahoney, Daniell Haenga, Tyson Crinis ect.

So if you are looking to improve your game, I am a certified coach and I can help you improve your game.

Great opportunity to learn the correct fundamentals along with putting it all into a routine you understand.

I myself have made many centuries at snooker including a 147 break. I have also made 4 centuries and a 98 in a row and many triple centuries and numerous back to back century breaks. I have represented Australia. I have also made state teams and the Australian team at 8ball. I have won major 8ball tournaments to. Anzac open, Dandenong open, Breakers open, Queens Birthday open, Lillydale open, Turks bar open etc. I have 30+yrs experience at snooker and 20+yrs experience at 8ball.

For coaching, inquiries message me through my page.

#Routine
#Learntheroutine
#RepeatOverUntilThisIsNowExact

Facebook link:
https://www.facebook.com/TheRoutineInstructorSnookerAnd8BallCoaching/

YouTube link:
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCNVwldb7Q3sA-dy6gLQt8sA

Scott Matthews - The Routine Instructor
Scott Matthews – The Routine Instructor
8 Ball Coach APP
8 Ball Coach APP

8 Ball Coach APP

Show me the money!

AEBF Eight Ball CoachThe Australian Eight Ball Federation has created a National Coaching Committee which currently consists of eight (8) State/Territory Coaching Directors and the National Coaching Director to administer the scheme on advice from the State Coaching Committees and the Australian Eight Ball Federation Executive Committee.

The objectives of the National Coaching Committee are to further the interests of Eight Ball and all their forms by:-

•    Making it easier for the beginner or novice to come into, and remain in the sport.
•    Helping any Eight Ball player to improve his or her proficiency and in doing so, improve his or her enjoyment of the sport.
•    Taking part in the training of teams and individuals to improve participation in National and International competition.

Under the Scheme. Any pupil who is able to play all the necessary shots with confidence and accuracy will be assured of reaching a good standard of play. How good, will depend on the individual’s character, ball sense, intelligence and most of all, determination to succeed.

The coach should at all times strive to achieve perfection in his or her art, by adapting the natural talent of the individual, to achieve perfection in the art of playing Eight Ball.

The Australian Eight Ball Federation believes that coaching is the essential ingredient towards providing the guidance necessary to build the sound technique and strong character required by a player to win a National and World championship and become an Australian Sporting Ambassador of whom we can all be proud.

Accordingly the Australian Eight Ball Federation’s National Coaching Accreditation Scheme provides co-ordinated training courses for coaches at three levels:-

•    LEVEL I    Club Level
•    LEVEL II    State Level
•    LEVEL III    National Level

The Scheme is designed to serve those who accept the challenge of effective instruction and to assist the improvement in standardisation of the art of coaching Eight Ball in Australia.

National Coaching Director

National Coaching Comittee
A.E.B.F:
  • National Coaching Director:
  • Greg Dingle
  • Ph 0424 884 744
  • email: coaching@aebf.com.au
  • web: www.8ballcoach.com.au
ACT:
NSW:
  • Coaching Cooridinator:
  • Damien Smith
  • Ph
  • email: coaching@nsw8ball.com.au
  • web: www.nsw8ball.com.au
NT:
QLD:
  • Coaching Cooridinator:
  • Greg Dingle
  • Ph 0424 884 744
  • email: coaching@qpool.com.au
  • web: www.qpool.com.au
SA:
TAS:
VIC:
WA:

8 Ball Coaching Links about Fundamentals

  1. A session with an experienced and qualified instructor can be very helpful to players at all levels.
  2. Make sure your stance is stable, provides clearance for the stroke, and is comfortable.
  3. Keep your grip relaxed during the entire stroke (see grip technique advice).
  4. Make sure you bridge is stable and still during your stroke (see bridge technique advice).
  5. Use a bridge length appropriate for you and a particular shot (see bridge length advice).
  6. Keep your cue still and eyes quiet when checking your cue alignment and aim (see reasons for pauses).
  7. Don’t rush the transition between the final back stroke and forward stroke (see stroke technique advice).
  8. Don’t drop your elbow during the stroke into the ball (see elbow drop).
  9. Stay down on the shot … don’t move your head or body during the stroke (see stroke technique advice).
  10. Don’t use more speed than is appropriate for a given shot.

Aiming

  1. Use a consistent and purposeful pre-shot routine.
  2. Make sure your vision center is always aligned properly.
  3. Ghost-ball aiming can be a useful visualization tool.
  4. The contact-point-to-contact-point or parallel-lines system can be a useful visualization tool.
  5. The double-the-distance or double-the-overlap aiming system can be a useful visualization tool.
  6. Your cue can be used to help you aim (see NV 3.2 and NV D.9).
  7. Make sure you are sighting shots consistently and purposefully.
  8. Be leery and suspicious of exaggerated claims concerning some cut-shot aiming systems. Having said this, these systems do offer benefits to some people.
  9. With good technique, HAMB (“Hit a Million Balls”) is the best “system” for aiming success.

8 Ball Coaching Links about Cue Ball Control

  1. The 90° rule predicts the CB heads down the tangent line for stun shots.
  2. The 30° rule predicts a rolling CB heads in the natural-angle direction.
  3. The Dr. Dave peace sign can be very useful in applying and making adjustments to the 30° rule.
  4. The 3-times-the-angle (trisect) system predicts the angle the CB direction changes for a good-action draw shot is 3-times the cut angle.
  5. For a fairly full hit, with a ball-hit-fraction greater than 3/4, the CB will deflect about 3-times the cut angle (see where the CB goes for different cases).
  6. For a fairly thin hit, with a ball-hit-fraction less than 1/4, the CB will deflect about 70-75% (about 3/4) of the angle between the aiming line and the tangent line (see where the CB goes for different cases).
  7. With all shots, more speed shifts the cue-ball farther down the tangent line before curving to the final direction (see CB path speed effects).

Speed Control

  1. The optimal tip height for speed control is 20% of the radius above center (see optimal tip height for speed control).
  2. With a full-hit rolling CB shot, the CB travels about 1/7 the distance of the OB after impact (see ball travel distances).
  3. With a rolling-CB half-ball hit, the CB and OB separate at close to same speed and same angle (see speed control article).
  4. With a 45° stun shot, the CB and OB separate at the same angle and distance (see speed control article).

Draw Shot

  1. Make sure your tip is well chalked, keep your grip relaxed, keep your cue as level as possible, accelerate smoothly into the ball (see draw shot technique advice).
  2. In general, for best draw distance control, use more spin with less speed (see physics-based draw shot advice).
  3. For a stun-back shot, with a small and controlled amount of draw, a firmer hit closer to center offers better CB distance control (see physics-based draw shot advice).
  4. Elevate the cue only when you need quick draw.
  5. Don’t push the miscue limit so much with long power draw shots.
  6. The 3-times-the-angle (trisect) system can be used to predict final CB direction with a good-action draw shot.
  7. Draw is a lot easier on slicker cloth (or with a CB treated with Silicon spray) and with a lighter CB.

English (sidespin)

  1. The miscue limit is half of the cue ball’s radius from the center, which is the width of the stripe on a striped ball (see “tips” of english articles).
  2. A solid understanding and feel for squirt, swerve, and throw effects is critical to being able to use sidespin effectively.
  3. back-hand english (BHE) and front-hand-english (FHE) can be used to compensate aim for squirt and swerve when using sidespin.
  4. Outside english can be used to eliminate throw, and this can be useful in clingy conditions (see gearing outside english).
  5. Running english can greatly reduce the difficulty of rail cut shots.
  6. Going ball-first or cushion-first with sidespin on rail cut shots makes a big difference in CB control (see NV B.72).
  7. A drag shot can be used to increase the effect of sidespin off a cushion (see maximum sidespin effect).

Position Control

  1. It is important to know various useful CB-control reference lines when planning position.
  2. It is much easier to control CB travel distance with natural-rolling follow shots (see follow shot accuracy).
  3. Always try to leave an angle and come into the line of a shot.
  4. When you leave yourself straight in, there are still options for position control (see NV B.30).
  5. Pocket cheating can help create an angle.
  6. Rail cut shots offer many position control options.
  7. Coming off a cushion can increase your margin for error when targeting a position close to a rail.
  8. The 45° rule, that predicts a ball rolling into an end cushion at close to a 45° angle heads close to the center of the table, if very useful for position play.
  9. Practice positioning the CB to the center of the table. This comes in handy in many game situations.

Safety Play

  1. Always play safe when it increases your chances of winning a game.
  2. Use two-way shots where possible when faced with a difficult shot (e.g., a bank).
  3. The 30° rule is very useful in safety play (see 30° rule examples).
  4. When playing a safety in 9-ball, try to leave the OB away from a cushion (see “big ball” effect).
  5. Come into the line of blockers when hooking your opponent.
  6. With ball-in-hand, try to be strategic with combos, clusters, and problem balls (see 30° rule examples).

8 Ball Coaching Links about Strategy

  1. Follow “best practices” concerning how and when to play safeties (see general safety advice).
  2. Don’t bump into or disturb other balls on the table if it isn’t necessary.
  3. Keep the CB away from the cushions to enable a wide range of tip positions without cue elevation.
  4. Pocket or move balls that clear the way for other balls as early as possible.
  5. Break out clusters and deal with problem balls as early as possible.
  6. In 8-ball, choose stripes or solids wisely and identify key balls for the game (see 8-ball strategy).
  7. In 8-ball, if you can’t run-out, play a safety early in the game.
  8. In 8-ball, break out clusters when an insurance ball is available.
  9. In 9-ball, break out clusters and problem balls at the right time (see 9-ball strategy).

Bank and Kick Shots

  1. To bank and kick effectively, it is important to understand and have a feel for all of the bank and kick effects.
  2. For rolling-ball kicks or banks, the through-diamond aiming system is very reliable.
  3. Faster speed can help bank shot accuracy and consistency (see advantages of fast speed).
  4. With shallow-angle kicks, the contact-point mirror system can be very effective.
  5. For cross-corner bank shots, it is very important to know how to detect and avoid double kisses.
  6. Sidespin can be used to alter bank shots (see spin transfer bank shots).
  7. For aiming two- and three-rail kicks off a short rail, the Plus System is very useful.
  8. For aiming two-, three-, and four-rail kicks off a long rail, the Corner 5 System is very useful.

Carom and Kiss Shots

  1. The 90 and 30° rules are very useful for aiming carom and kiss shots (see carom and kiss shot aiming).
  2. When two OBs are frozen, the combination direction can be changed quite a bit with throw (see frozen-ball throw).
  3. Bob Jewett’s two-times-fuller and ten-times fuller systems are useful to aim frozen carom and kiss shots.

Throw

  1. A solid understanding and feel for throw effects is important, expecially for combos and small-gap shots.
  2. Maximum CIT, with no sidespin, occurs with slow speed at about a 1/2-ball hit (see maximum throw).
  3. Maximum SIT occurs occurs with slow speed and about 50% sidespin (see maximum throw).
  4. Maximum throw, under typical conditions, is about 1 inch per foot of OB travel, or 1/2 a ball per diamond on a 9′ table, which is about 5°.
  5. When the CB is fairly close to the OB, SIT can be used for a “hold” or “kill” shot to limit cue ball drift.
  6. When balls are frozen, it is very easy to achieve maximum CIT of the 2nd ball (see frozen-ball throw).
  7. Gearing outside english can be used to eliminate throw, but this might not be the best approach for all people and situations (see using outside english to prevent throw and cling).
  8. Transferring spin from the CB to the OB is an important effects with some shots (see spin transfer for examples).

Break Shot

  1. The optimal tip height for a lag shot is 20% of the ball radius above center (see lag shot).
  2. Follow the “best practices” for an accurate, consistent, and effective break (see getting a tight rack and break technique advice).
  3. Knowing where different balls tend to go in a 9-ball rack can be useful to know (see pattern racking strategy).
  4. In 8-ball, a 2nd-ball break from side can be used to make the 8-ball on the break.
  5. If you use a break cue with a natural pivot length well matched to your bridge length, stroking errors will not affect your accuracy (see pivot-length article).

Jump Shot

  1. For best results, follow all of the recommended “best practices” (see jump shot technique advice).
  2. For best jump results, aim between the center of the CB and resting point on the cloth (see jump shot article).
  3. To jump higher and shorter, elevate the cue; to jump longer, use more speed and less cue elevation (see jump shot article).
  4. With more cue elevation, the dart stroke will be more comfortable and effective for most people (see jump shot technique advice).
  5. Jump shots are often over cut due to the CB hopping in the OB (see jump shot over cut effect).

Massé Shot

  1. For best results, follow all of the recommended “best practices” (see massé shot technique advice).
  2. The Coriolis aiming system for massé shots can be very effective.
  3. After-collision massé shots can be very useful when you need to curve the CB path after contact with the OB.